Good to See in the EDP

Launched during lockdown, there’s still a way to go until we can offer a wide range of accommodation to pilgrims – from camping plots to indoor camping, bunkhouse and B&B – any suggestions please be in touch.

It is a work in progress

And if you could spare time and talents to help the project it would be great to have a chat. Get in touch with the web shepherd richardmwoodham@gmail.com

All Clear on the Ringland Crossing

Since Stop the Wensum Link forced Norfolk County Council to re-think the route of the road planned to join Norwich’s Northern Distributor Road with the Southern Bypass, contractors equipment and the temporary bridge roadway have been moved off the marsh and calm has been restored.

Crossing the busy (fast flowing) Fakenham Road the route follows the drive and keeps left of the farm buildings, before arriving at the fast flowing River Wensum.

View from the Bridge

From the bridge over the Wensum a diagonal path takes pilgrims to a new bridge over a drainage dyke. The woods on the skyline are where Europe’s largest roost of barbestrelle bats is located !

The New Bridge

The next leg heading to the left of Low Farm is a bit boggy where the temporary roadway has been taken up but otherwise fairly dry.

The route up and over Royal Hill now runs through pig city

Pig City

On reaching the quiet road , the hum of the traffic on the other side of the valley can just be heard. A left turn takes pilgrims to Ringland Church with an angel roof and some medieval glass. A right turn leads towards Weston Longville.

Sweet Briar Marshes

Might a donation towards this appeal be an act of devotion ?

Norfolk Wildlife Trust Appeal

Leaving Norwich pilgrims track the River Wensum as it winds a green corridor through edgy industrial and residential estates. Some of those with a devotion to Jesus’ mum, may be travelling with rosary beads in their back pockets. The Rosary derives its name from titles given to Mary Rosa Mystica or The Rose of Sharon that refer to Mary’s role as the final blossoming of Isaiah’s prophecy of the Jesse Tree – “And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots” (Isaiah 11)

Unknown
The Virgin and Child in a Red Rose, about 1480–1490, Tempera colors and gold leaf
Leaf: 11.9 × 17 cm (4 11/16 × 6 11/16 in.), Ms. 101 (2008.3), fol. 78v
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Ms. 101, fol. 78v

The native English Dog Rose, so abundant along the Walsingham Way, is not, so the experts tell me, an actual Sweet Briar but its very like. Like enough for this pilgrim’s mind to turn to Mary at the sight of a flower or bright red hips in the autumn hedgerows.

Baptism of Christ

For your prayers……

Rivers near and far are under threat from pollution and over extraction. True of the River Jordan and true of Norfolk’s rivers.

From the ‘Holkham Bible Picture Book’© The British Library

As Christ was baptised in the Jordan, it is imagined that the first Christians in East Anglia were baptised in rivers, as Paulinus baptised Northumbrian converts in the River Glen.

Walking the Walsingham Way, from Norwich to Great Ryburgh in the Wensum Valley to the healing waters of the Walsingham Shrine beside the River Stiffkey; a pilgrims own baptism and the promise of “living water, welling up to eternal life” is often a recurring theme.

In a post COP26 world caring for the creation has to be the concern of all people of good will

The good news is ………

Improving the condition of our rivers is the concern of the Norfolk Rivers Trust

www.norfolkriverstrust.org

A threat ….

A controversial new road linking roads north and south of the River Wensum would cut across the route of the Walsingham Way.

Stop the Wensum Link

The case against it is argued by Stop the Wensum Link , the case for by Norfolk County Council

2021 Review of the Year

January

Lockdown kept many pilgrims close to home. Back gardens, parks and local churches in the landscape took on new significance. In the nick of time, an unexpected, last of E.U. money grant, enabled us to waymark the Norwich to Walsingham leg. It was exciting to see the new finger posts appearing appeared along the route.

February

March and April

And then the scramble to finalise, waymark and publish the first and last bits of the route – from each of Norwich’s two cathedrals

……………………………………….to Walsingham direct, or via the Slipper Chapel.

And, because pilgrims need to sleep and feed, an initial amenities map .

Mary’s Month of May

The Launch

Launch of the Walsingham Way at Walsingham Abbey. Elizabeth Meath Baker, centre, with from left: Father Kevin Smith, Gail Mayhew, Revd Dr Peter Doll and Mgr Philip Moger. Photograph: Norwich Cathedral/Bill Smith

The Summer : COP 26 Norfolk Relay

Enabled by the WW team, Norfolk climate crisis pilgrimage followed our already established routes from Great Yarmouth to Norwich and on to Dereham; then used Norfolk Trail’s Cross Norfolk Route to Lynn.

Along the way church communities stepped up to welcome pilgrims as they crossed the heart of Norfolk and prayed for COP 26 Conference.

The Autumn

In spite of the the can we/ can’t we COVID dance, some little progress has been made towards:

Autumn also found us playing catchup once again as people asked, “Is there something about the WW in print?” A first attempt at an answer is available to downloadable from the website. Something more worthy of a print run is being prepared

Connecting to the Norfolk Trails Network

Norfolk Trails are a brilliant network and dovetail well with the Walsingham Way. The Great Yarmouth to Norwich leg follows the Wherryman’s Way. The Norwich to Walsingham leaves Norwich on the Marriott’s Way before turning off to cross the River Wensum at Ringland. Walsingham Pilgrims can arrive and leave Walsingham via the Coast Path and this route between Walsingham and Wells.